Saturday, November 29, 2014

WAWADIA? How about WCWDIA: 5 tips on What Can We Do in Asana? ( A response to Matthew Remski)

Mathew Remski has recently started a project called WAWADIA.(Whatare We Actually Doing in Asana?) which is creating lots of discussion in the yoga community.  As a physical therapist and biokinesiologist, this question has been loudly blaring in my mind since I have started my yoga practice over 14 years ago.  In the beginning, I assumed it was because I did not know enough about the practice, so I would just follow my  teachers when they would confidently say things such as “this is the pure posture as taught to me by Swami What’sHisName when I was studying with him for the last 15 years,  so just do it! “  As time passed and I deepened my knowledge of the practice, doing the requisite 500 Hour Teacher Training and eventually studying yoga therapy,  I realized the dirty little secret that Matthew so astutely reveals…we don’t really know What We are Actually Doing in Asana!  And neither did Swami What’sHisName. 




  In a recent podcast, The Liberated Body hosted  by  Brooke Thomas,  Matthew mentions that in addition to this question, he would like to ask “what can we do in asana to make it a safer, more efficient practice biomechanically for the body?”  This response is to offer some suggestions, based on my 25 years in the field of physical therapy, the last 10 which have been working with persons on an individual basis using yoga asana as one of the tools to help them heal structural injuries, not just a few of which have been “because”  of yoga.  These are things you can do now, until the time comes when the majority of yoga instructors begin to understand that the in depth knowledge of how the body moves can only enhance their teaching and help their students keep coming back, without injury. 

Just to be clear, I love the practice of yoga.  It has helped me become healthier and happier and I have seen this occur in the many clients who I have worked with who have embraced the practice.  My livelihood is dedicated to spreading the practice of yoga to others, and helping them learn how to use it as a tool to help them in their lives, but it is only one tool.  I am not condemning anyone who teaches asana practices, but instead challenging them to perhaps dig a little deeper, not to accept and teach practices that they don’t fully understand and to get in on the discussion and conversation that Matthew started.   We all know that asana is only one small part of yoga, but let’s face it, it is the biggest part that modern society is now practicing, and it’s the part that is causing the physical injuries that William Broad discussed in his now infamous article,  HowYoga Can Wreck Your Body  in the NY Times. 

  This article got national exposure, and scared (maybe appropriately?) many people away from yoga practice.  Below are some tips  to address some of the things we can start today,  things which on the cutting edge of modern research I might add, to help us prevent injury from the practice of yoga, as well as use it to maintain structural health and possibly heal a structural injury. 



1.       Stop practicing yoga to stretch tight muscles, it doesn’t work! 
This radical thought will probably rock the yoga world.  When the general yoga population is polled as to why they practice yoga, the majority state it is to gain flexibility.  Unfortunately, the latest research is showing that stretching does not really change your flexibility and that flexibility probably does not help improve function or performance.   Any changes you are seeing in flexibility are due to the changes in the nervous system, not how hard you pull on your hamstings or how deep you go into a backbend.  For a deeper discussion on this particular issue, read a few blogs by my wonderful colleague Jules Mitchell, who spent the past two years investigating the research on stretching and yoga.  She describes what stretching is and what is isn’t, and what we really need to do in asana to actually increase muscle stiffness to improve efficiency.   


2.       Get a one on one assessment of your body’s structure and weak links by a qualified yoga teacher, personal trainer, physical therapist or yoga therapist trained in structural assessment.   This is probably the most important tip.  You may think that I am just promoting my profession (which is true), but I have good reason.  It is virtually impossible for your yoga teacher to know what your individual body’s’ needs are and address them adequately in a group yoga class.  We all have our body’s history of lifestyle and trauma; emotional, physical and mental.  This is held in our body and manifested through dysfunctional movement.  When we practice yoga, we are moving the body biomechanically, with various levels of force and contraction through movement patterns.  These movement patterns are affected by our individual alignments, weaknesses and strengths. 

     In order to make your practice fit your body, you must know where you might be compensating, where your muscles might be overworking and learn to use the asana practice to create more efficiency and balance in your  movement patterns.

3.       Individualize your practice to address your needs.  You may think that getting an individual assessment means you have to practice alone, and not attend a group class.  But to the contrary, having this knowledge will transform your practice to one that is specific to your needs and instead of getting hurt, you will stay healthy or even begin to heal.  Attend the group class after you learn from your yoga assessment session how to adjust the postures to meet your goals.  Yes, they probably will tell you to do a short 15 minute home practice a few days a week to target certain areas more intensely, but you can take that knowledge into your practice, be it Bikram, Ashtanga,  general vinyasa or restorative, and make that practice your own. 


4.       Consider adding foam rolling for myofascial release into your asana practice.  Since we now know we don’t really stretch our muscles (i.e. change their length), we can use the foam roller to help improve mobility of the muscles and connective tissues to allow the nervous system to more efficiently activate your muscles.  Research into foam rolling has found some wonderful benefits which will help you learn to release overactive muscles and activate those that need to awaken in order to improve efficiency and alignment.  As described in the review by Chris Beardsley entitled Does Research Support Foam Rolling, foam rolling is beneficial pre exercise to reduce muscle fatigue and possibly improve exercise performance.  It will improve the joint range of motion without decreasing performance.   Post exercise, foam rolling can help decrease muscle soreness, possibly improving your ability to train again sooner and with less discomfort.  Foam rolling is not utilized in order to improve flexibility, but to decrease the neural activation of the resting tone in the prime movers (which are usually the muscles you think are “tight”) 

      Once you reset that neural tone of the tissue, the muscle is better able to release and relax, thus allowing an increased range of motion of the joint.  This results in more efficient movement of the joint and allows one to begin to activate those muscles which may have been “lazy” and not doing their job.  Those lazy muscles are what caused the brain to tell the compensating muscles to “tighten up” in the first place in order to perform the movement or protect you from injury.  To learn how to incorporate myofascial release into your yoga practice, check out Yoga TuneUP and Rollasana. 




5.         Finally, move through your practice with BAMA (Breath, Alignment, Mostility and Awareness)

a.        Breath:  the foundation of the asana practice.  We all know it, it’s undeniable, yet I have been to many a yoga practice where I did not hear the students breathing or the instructor really cuing the breath.  All I can say is please include this as the foundation of your practice. 
b.      Alignment:  if your body is out of alignment, your movement is inefficient and you will create overuse injuries from repetitive stress.  This is well established in the literature. Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA was a ground breaking physical therapist in the area of movement dysfunction.  Her philosophy, if we move with poor initial alignment, we are setting ourselves up for failure and possible pain.  If you are a kinesiology geek, her text, Diagnosis and Treatment of Movement Impairment Syndromes is a must read.  If you aren’t, just trust me, alignment is important.
c.       Mostility:  Mobility and Stability are the keys to efficient movement. Since one is codependent on the other, I came up with a new term, Mostility.   If you have decreased mobility of a joint, it is usually due not to a tight muscle, but to a combination of fascial restrictions and connective tissue from an injury or repetitive movement dysfunction coupled with poor activation of the prime movers as well as some muscles compensating for that poor activation with over activation.  A prime example, the hamstrings in someone who is active in athletics tend to get what they perceive as tight.  This tightness is actually increased contraction of the hamstrings to compensate for relative inactivity of the gluteus maximus, which is the primary hip extensor.  Once the athlete learns to turn on the gluts as the prime mover instead of the hamstrings, his tightness miraculously decreases. This athlete could practice this in an asana practice by paying attention in poses like Shalambasana as to how he turns on his hip extension, activating the gluts before the hamstrings.   This is just one example of how knowing what to activate and how can change your movement patterns.
d.      Awareness:  One word, Feldenkrais.  What is it?  The Feldenkrais Method is experiential, providing tools for self-observation through movement enquiry.  It is used to improve movement patterns rather than to treat specific injuries or illnesses.  Feldenkrais taught that increasing a person's kinesthetic and proprioceptive self-awareness of functional movement could lead to increased function, reduced pain, and greater ease and pleasure of movement. Wow, that sounds like yoga with awareness to me. 
So what is the conclusion?  What We Are Doing in Asana is still being debated and investigated.  It is only through the work of those who are brave enough to bring this issue to our attention that we can begin to address the impact of this practice in creating injuries.  Purists may balk that this is taking the yoga out of the yoga practice.  But to the contrary, what could be more in line with the practice of yoga than practicing ahimsa in our asana practice?    That is…do no harm. 

Update on WADWADIA!  If you would like to contribute to Matthew's research and help him write his book, you can pre order it and/or provide financial support. Click HERE for more info! 
Chrys Kub is an integrative physical therapist who incorporates therapeutic yoga as a tool in her practice.  She is also an educator in therapeutic yoga through teacher trainings and the yoga therapy program with Holistic Yoga Therapy Institute.  She provides continuing education in yoga therapy online through YogaUOnline, HomeCEUConnection.com  and PTCourses.com.  She also travels throughout the United States presenting yoga therapy at conferences and to health practitioners to help spread the benefits of yoga to all who are willing to learn.  You can  Chrys at  fityogatherapy@gmail.com

Links:


2)      Liberated Body Podcast

3)      Brooke Thomas



4)      How Yoga Can Wreck Your Body 


5)      Jules Mitchell  


6)      Does research Support Foam Rolling?


7)      Yoga TuneUp  



8)      Rollasana 



9)      Diagnosis and Treatment of Movement Impairment Syndromes


10)   Chrys Kub 




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